Cambrige Orthopaedic GroupSpire - Cambridge Lea HospitalEnquiries helpline 01223 266 982
Knee Procedures
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Introduction

Osteoarthritis is the most common type of knee arthritis. Osteoarthritis is characterised by progressive wearing away of the cartilage of the joint exposing the bare bone within the joint.

The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is one of four ligaments that provide stability of the knee joint. A ligament is made of tough fibrous material and functions to control excessive motion by limiting joint mobility. The four major stabilising ligaments of the knee are the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL), and the medial and lateral collateral ligaments (MCL and LCL). The medial collateral ligament resists widening of the inside of the joint, or prevents "opening-up" of the knee. Because the medial collateral ligament resists widening of the inside of the knee joint, the MCL is usually injured when the outside of the knee joint is hit which causes the outside of the knee to buckle, and the inside to widen.

The posterior cruciate ligament, or PCL, is one of four ligaments important to the stability of the knee joint. The anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, sits just in front of the PCL and keeps the tibia from sliding too far forwards. The PCL is the ligament that prevents the tibia (shinbone) from sliding too far backwards, and helps to maintain the tibia in position below the femur (thigh bone).

The most common injury of the PCL is when the knee is bent, and an object forcefully hits the tibia backwards and cause a PCL to tear. The other injuries a PCL may incur is the hyperflexion of the knee, with the foot held pointing downwards. These movements stress the PCL, and if the force is high enough, a PCL will tear.

The following consultants specialise in knee procedures: Mr. Jai Chitnavis, Mr. P. Julian Owen, Mr. Neil Rushton, Mr Alastair Vince, Mr Dennis Edwards and Mr Graham Keene.

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